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Old 12-03-2017, 04:02 PM   #1
Morfz
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Default Live recording mic placement

So today I tried recording some live demos with my cousin and brother. I used my focusrite scarlett 2i2 and we used two mics that my cousin had. We played in the studio/place we play at. I think we got some decent quality sound. My question is regarding general mic placement. Where would you suggest I place the mics in future attempts? Also how would you place the amps for the bass and guitar in relation to each other and the mics? Thanks for helping out!

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Old 12-03-2017, 04:04 PM   #2
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This would be a good question for Borodog, hopefully he'll come along & reply.
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Old 12-03-2017, 04:52 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlyKat View Post
This would be a good question for Borodog, hopefully he'll come along & reply.
Sweet! Yeah that would be cool.

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Old 12-03-2017, 05:26 PM   #4
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If you are just trying to capture the "live sound", putting the mics centrally so that they pick up everything equally is best.

If you are trying to multitrack, you are best off getting each track out of the board. For that you need an interface with as many inputs as instruments, which may get unwieldy. I
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Old 12-03-2017, 05:53 PM   #5
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For me, mic placement depends on the Genre, volume, sound and tones I'm looking for.

I use SM-57's only because that's the ones I've always used, and I have 5 of them.

My general area if I'm using one mic is 2-3 inches from the grill, off axis (1-2 inches from the center of the cone) at around 45 degrees angle. I place it this way for mostly Hard Rock/Metal for a bit of mid scoop and Bass tones.

Volume and room size plays a factor in how far away from the grill I place the mic. If you're the type that plays on 10, back the mic away up to a foot. You want to hear the speaker, not the clipping, but if you go too far away, the mic starts to become a room mic (Ambient) and looses directness and will pick up other sounds going on in the room (Mic bleed). Stay as close as possible without clipping the signal or lower the volume at the amp to the mic for more clarity and less hiss.

For a more robust sound, I'll use up to 4 mics for one or more speakers placed at different axis's, angles and distance away from the speaker/s and blend them in with a mixer. There is a lot of trial and error, but when you get where you want to be tone wise, mark off (Box) the area with painters tape on the grill. This way you always have a reference point. Write down all the measurements along the way, so you have that to fall back on just in case.

What I would suggest, in a situation where everything is being recorded off the floor (Live, all at once) is to use partition panels or make an insulated box (Cardboard, ply. MDF..as long as it has at least a R-12 value..Roxul Safe and Sound is what I used when I made my ISO cab) that will fit over the mic with 3 inches gap all around. This will deflect any bleeding.

When it comes to the bass and guitar in relation to each other and the mics, never face each other. That's a recipe for bleeding. 30-45 degrees angle off each has always worked for me when facing the drummer. It all depends on the room size and what can be moved around. In a small rehearsal space (12x12), this works.

On the cheap, hanging comforters along the walls really helps absorb bouncing sounds. Moving blankets work just as well.
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Old 12-03-2017, 06:18 PM   #6
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Thanks for the extremely valuable information guys. Ill try your suggestions out the next time we play!

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Old 12-03-2017, 07:20 PM   #7
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Mike placement is situation dependent. Hmmmmm.... You only have 2 mikes? At least 10 feet apart and at least shoulder high. Got plenty of mikes? Everybody gets one and 18 inches in front of each amp so the mike doesn't interact with the amps electronics. Dynamic mikes are based on a coil element. Speakers are based on a coil element. Those two coils should not be interacting and creating hum. That's why most people who jam the mike right up in front of the speaker, turn it at least 45 degrees. The next time you are playing a single coil guitar, turn the volume up and rotate the guitar 90 degrees. Wow! The hum goes away. That's because the pickup coil and the speaker coil are talking to each other.
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