Guitar Forums

Go Back   Guitar Forums > The Gear > DIY

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-02-2018, 03:18 AM   #1
DMiller
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: USA, California, Modesto
Posts: 10
DMiller Just getting started
Default Side Bending Methods?

Hello to everyone. For a long time iv'e been wanting to build my own jumbo/ grand auditorium cutaway guitar and recently I have began. This is my first build; i'm finding out it is much more expensive to build a guitar than I thought! My main question for you builder is this: for starting side bending as a beginner, is it easier to use a heating iron or silicone heating blanket? If you prefer one over the other, why? Do any of you have any suggestions on which heating iron/ blanket to purchase? Thank you all for your time and for looking at and helping me with my questions. (: Thanks again, Dale
DMiller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2018, 05:10 AM   #2
PKVeazey
Old Timer
 
PKVeazey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: South Central Virginia
Posts: 900
PKVeazey Just getting started
Default

A heat pipe is the most common method I've seen. I'll never understand how they do it without cracking the wood.
__________________
Always B natural, Sometimes B sharp, Never B flat.
PKVeazey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2018, 05:12 AM   #3
Seattle
Senior Member
 
Seattle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 1,197
Seattle Just getting started Seattle Just getting started
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PKVeazey View Post
A heat pipe is the most common method I've seen. I'll never understand how they do it without cracking the wood.
Moisture.
Seattle is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2018, 12:59 PM   #4
DanRode
Dixie Flatline
 
DanRode's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Northeast Ohio
Posts: 1,440
DanRode The Oven's On But Nothing's Cooking DanRode The Oven's On But Nothing's Cooking DanRode The Oven's On But Nothing's Cooking
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Seattle View Post
Moisture.
+1

Steam bending. https://www.leevalley.com/us/html/05F1501ie.pdf
__________________
You practice and you get better. It's very simple. - Phillip Glass
DanRode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2018, 07:46 PM   #5
pdawg0
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: TX and NY
Posts: 660
pdawg0 Just getting started
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Seattle View Post
Moisture.
I've always thought this was a big advantage for a laminated body guitar. Very thin pieces of wood are steamed and shaped. The glue is applied prior to bending, in a heated press, such that when the glue sets, the laminated structure is in the proper shape for the guitar sides. There are some very good videos on YT of this process in the Seagull factory.
pdawg0 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2018, 08:46 PM   #6
Seattle
Senior Member
 
Seattle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 1,197
Seattle Just getting started Seattle Just getting started
Default

Lamination isn't always a bad thing. It's stronger. It doesn't have to look bad either. It depends what you laminate. I have a nice arch top electric hollowbody guitar that is laminated with Canadian black cherry.

It's loud as an acoustic (because it's so big), it looks good, is sturdy, and sounds good as an electric. It's not a cheapo guitar. It sells new for $1,000 or so but lamination by itself doesn't tell you the whole story.
Seattle is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 08:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Guitar Competition | Piano Lessons