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Old 06-20-2017, 02:03 PM   #21
BallisticSquid
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As a kid, my friend who was taking lessons taught me the basics...open chords, barre chords, power chords. I would spend a lot of time trying to figure out songs. It was hard because I had absolutely no context since I had no knowledge of scales at all. I knew the names of the chords and I knew how the major scale worked to move the barre shapes.

All of my friends that played music then marched off into the sunset without me because my parents wouldn't let me be in a band.

I dabbled with guitar through my 20's banging on some crappy acoustic that gradually lost strings. In my early 30's I got myself a strat and got myself an instructional video on playing the blues. Once I finished that, I decided to take lessons. I did that for a year. The main thing I learned from him were the pentatonic scales in all of the positions and the Comfortably Numb solo.

4 years ago I signed up for GuitarTricks. I went through their blues course and have gone through a bunch of song lessons.

I think I'd benefit from private lessons, but I just don't have the time.
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Old 06-20-2017, 02:28 PM   #22
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Online videos can't break you of your bad habits. I would think it would be pretty easy, learning entirely from online or other media, to develop a technique that's really idiosyncratic. That's not necessarily bad, but if you reach a hurdle you can't jump, chops-wise, it may involve breaking down and re-learning the "proper" way to do things after years' worth of "self-taught" bad technique.

But if you've got the basics down and want to branch into new genres or just expand your knowledge I'm sure videos are great.
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Old 06-20-2017, 02:36 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Mr. Boston View Post
Online videos can't break you of your bad habits. I would think it would be pretty easy, learning entirely from online or other media, to develop a technique that's really idiosyncratic. That's not necessarily bad, but if you reach a hurdle you can't jump, chops-wise, it may involve breaking down and re-learning the "proper" way to do things after years' worth of "self-taught" bad technique.

But if you've got the basics down and want to branch into new genres or just expand your knowledge I'm sure videos are great.
That ship sailed for me long ago! If you watch videos on technique, it seems every player has their own way that they developed. Picking comes to mind...there is so much contradictory information out there on picking technique. Each technique works very well for the player describing it, so it seem like a "whatever works for you, works" thing.

You have to find the right teacher also. I spent more than half of my lesson time watching my teacher transcribe solos we were working on. I wouldn't have even come close to mastering it, and we be off onto the next thing. I fell far behind, got frustrated, and stopped lessons...it was a waste of my time. As I watch my kids in their lessons for piano and viola, I see how it is supposed to work.

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Old 06-20-2017, 02:39 PM   #24
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I am self taught, save for piano lessons I had at age 9 till 11. My guitar is self taught with video here and there. As for bad habits I would raise the subject of, playing how you feel comfortable. One is free to develop playing with whatever works. Prime example is Eric Gales: One of the best guitarists I have ever seen ( words do not express how insanely good that guy is) who plays a right handed guitar left handed with the strings upside down too (Thickest strings lowest). He picked it up and thought that that was how you were supposed to play it and he didnt know any better, it felt right to him.
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Old 06-20-2017, 02:43 PM   #25
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Mostly self taught.

Mel Bay chord book was essential. I took lessons for a month or so but was mainly learning chords and some songs so I figured it wasn't really worthwhile. I never learned to read music and I regret that. I feel like I would be a better, more advanced player had I taken it more seriously when I was growing up and learning.

When I was a teenager my friends and I would jam and teach each other songs and licks so though I say self taught, there was a lot of communal teaching going on.

For learning new songs my first stop is to try and play with the track. If I can't figure it out easily from there I go online. If I can find a tutorial then great. I look at all tutorials available and then I look at videos of the band playing the song live. If none of the tutorials are right I figure it out myself. If they are close I will go with the best and make any corrections I need.
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Old 06-20-2017, 03:00 PM   #26
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I decided I was ready to start learning fingerstyle blues last week. I got a video course by a teacher I like and in the first lesson he explains how to position fingers and thumb in relation the each other. He immediately go on to say (I'm paraphrasing) "This is folk music do what works for you. Maybe in 5 years people will be discussing your amazing right hand technique."

I see people play with 3 fingers, 2 fingers, 1 finger and various hand placements. IMO, you have to find out what works for you and then spend time getting good at it until it sounds right to your ears.

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Originally Posted by BallisticSquid View Post
If you watch videos on technique, it seems every player has their own way that they developed. Picking comes to mind...there is so much contradictory information out there on picking technique. Each technique works very well for the player describing it, so it seem like a "whatever works for you, works" thing.
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Old 06-20-2017, 03:03 PM   #27
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My experience with lessons.

Teacher 1: What song do you want to learn?

Teacher 2: What song do you want to learn?

Teacher 3: What song do you want to learn?
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Old 06-20-2017, 03:14 PM   #28
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I'm 99.5% self taught via the internet. After a bit more than a year, I'm not very good but I can play all the open chords well, power chords are cake and I'm OK with many barre chords. I can play a handful of simple songs completely and a variety of licks and riffs from songs. Maybe in another year I'll have a better idea how this self teaching experiment is progressing.

I had a few skype lessons and I did learn some stuff but I'm better self-directed. The feedback was the most useful part of the lessons. IMO, I need objective critique not instruction from a teacher. It's easy to form bad habits when there's no one to tell you it's wrong.

I probably just need to find a friend to plays guitar to tell me what I'm doing wrong.

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Old 06-20-2017, 03:17 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigMoney View Post

On the other hand you can't jam with the internet like you can a teacher. They will also point out your mistakes way faster than the internet. Backing tracks are great, but jamming with a person teaches you much more.

What do you guys think?
I am completely self-taught and back then there was nothing like internet or youtube. After playing 3 or 4 years i wanted to get lessons with a know jazz-guitar player, especially for Blues etc. I went in with my Gibson Firebird and the first thing he said ''Well next time you come with a guitar! A classical guitar! Classic is the base of it all''. Unfortunately classic wasn't at all what I intended so there was no ''next time'' - especially at $40 per lesson i wanted to learn what i liked to and not classical theory. Basically all done by learning some basic chords from books/prints and playing along with records after having figured out the key like most who started 40+ years ago.

There are different ways to jam on internet with persons worldwide. Personally i like wikiloops alot even it isn't a real-time jamming.
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Old 06-20-2017, 03:19 PM   #30
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I am amazed at how the great majority...just about everyone here is self taught. Incredible and I tip my hat to all of you.

I tried learning on the internet for about two weeks. it was awful. I noticed if something was hard I would just skip it. I had no discipline. I have been taking private lessons since then.

My teacher throws a technique, song or crazy chord or two at me and I have one week until I see him again. I have to answer to someone and cannot "skip" anything.

I also like when I'm given songs or things I normally wouldn't gravitate to. Example: reading music. I love it but would never have approached this on my own.

I suppose eventually I will have to go out on my own. Hopefully by that time I will have some quiet time and can try and write a song.
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