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Old 09-29-2017, 03:39 PM   #1
Smedley Fingers
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Default D#dim

Does anyone actually play this chord in a song. it seems I need to break some bones to get my pinky on the D# note. I guess I'll check You Tube as Maybe there's something I'm doing wrong.


http://jguitar.com/images/chordshape...C2%2C4%2C2.png
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Old 09-29-2017, 07:49 PM   #2
PKVeazey
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Unless I needed that exact voicing, I'd play the standard Ukulele chord. The old timers call it the Ukulele chord because I has 4 notes and looks like something you'd play on a Ukulele.
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Old 09-29-2017, 08:35 PM   #3
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Yes, it isn't a voicing I would use unless absolutely essential. See how x3424x sounds, or xx4545. Those are two moveable dim7 shapes I use most often.
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Old 09-30-2017, 02:52 PM   #4
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You don't need to finger the first D# on the 4th string since it is doubled on the second string. you can bar your first finger across the first 3 strings at the second fret and finger the D# with your ring finger on the second fret.

Last edited by classicrock; 09-30-2017 at 03:07 PM.
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Old 09-30-2017, 04:04 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smedley Fingers View Post
Does anyone actually play this chord in a song. it seems I need to break some bones to get my pinky on the D# note. I guess I'll check You Tube as Maybe there's something I'm doing wrong.


http://jguitar.com/images/chordshape...C2%2C4%2C2.png


I don't find that shape difficult, but I doubt I'd ever use it.

Move everything up to the 6th fret and over a string for a more manageable version:

x6787x


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Old 09-30-2017, 04:37 PM   #6
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Will this work?
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File Type: png Eb dim.png (1.2 KB, 2 views)
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Old 09-30-2017, 06:40 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smedley Fingers View Post
Does anyone actually play this chord in a song.
Almost certainly not. Forget it!

It's important to distinguish three types of diminished chords:

1. Dim triad. This is the kind shown in your diagram, consisting of root, b3 b5 (with one note doubled in that shape). Nobody EVER uses this chord. Except maybe as a reduced version of one of the following*:

2. Dim7, aka "full diminished". This adds a bb7 ("diminished 7th") to the dim triad, and what is usually meant when you see a plain "dim" symbol in a chord chart (because the triad is so rare). This is the chord referred to by Tony Done and Hi Hat above.
D#dim7 = x-x-1-2-1-2. (or 4-5-4-5, 7-8-7-8, 10-11-10-11, etc, because the structure is symmetrical - 3 frets up produce the same 4 notes in a different order.)
The middle 4 string shape is x-3-4-2-4-x, x-6-7-5-7-x, 9-10-8-10-, etc.

3. m7b5, aka "half-diminished". This adds a b7 (minor 7th) to the dim triad.
Easiest shapes for D#m7b5 = x-x-1-2-2-2, or x-6-7-6-7-x

*A dim triad is also a rootless dom7, which might be useful to know. So D#dim (triad only) is B7 without the B. Still, B7 is normally easier to play than D#dim (and sounds better), so you wouldn't normally choose the latter in preference. But sometimes jazz players will choose D#dim7 in place of B7b9. If you're not a wannabe jazz player... ignore this paragraph.

Last edited by JonR; 09-30-2017 at 06:50 PM.
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